Org Mode Cookbook Revistited

Org Mode Cookbook Revistited:

If you’re an Org user, especially if you use Org to produce documents, you should take a look at Neilsen’s cookbook and bookmark it for future use.

(Via Emacs – Irreal)

This is another great resource I regularly use.

[Emergency Response] Why interaction design is important ↦

Why interaction design is important ↦:

The Honolulu Civil Beat has tweeted a screenshot of the interface that was used to send an real alert for a nonexistent incoming ballistic missile on Saturday morning.

Fake Hawaii Missile Alert

Instead of selecting “DRILL – PACOM (CDW) – STATE ONLY” from what looks more like a list of headlines on The Drudge Report than a warnings & alerts menu, the operator chose “PACOM (CDW) – STATE ONLY” and sent out a real alert.

The design for this is obviously terrible.

Talk about setting yourself up to fail and fail spectacularly. 

The employee made a mistake but it’s not his fault and he shouldn’t be fired for it. The interface is the problem and whoever caused that to happen — the designer, the software vendor, the heads of the agency, the lawmakers who haven’t made sufficient funds available for a proper design process to occur — should face the consequences. More importantly, the necessary changes should be made to fix the problem in a way that’s holistic, resilient, long-lasting, and helps operators make good decisions rather than encouraging mistakes.

(Via Six Colors)

I can’t wait for an in depth professional and academic review of this event. So many basic things went wrong here we can all use this as a reminder to look at the foundations of our emergency response/security incident assumptions, tools, processes, training, etc.

‘MacBook Pro? No.’ ↦

‘MacBook Pro? No.’ ↦:

 

Conclusion

If Apple wants to make a MacBook Pro, they should quit with the design fundamentalism on a machine costing £2800 (£2800 is a ton of money for an ordinary laptop, which apart from the display, this is) and quit with what seem like cost-cutting measures in the name of power efficiency. This machine is no doubt powerful. It never struggles with software, everything runs at a decent clip (when the power is plugged in) and it’s stable, but it’s not a Pro machine — just about any decent PC laptop at not much more than half the price of my MacBook Pro will give me “Pro” functionality.

I say make it faster, make the battery bigger, make the laptop slightly thicker, make the keyboard decent (heck just make it like the Magic Keyboard), get rid of the Touch Bar, make the display a 16” 4K HDR OLED, bring back some kind of MagSafe, bring the lit Apple logo back, bring back the SD card slot, add three USB 3 slots, make the trackpad smaller, beef up the GPU so that it can handle VR and games, and make it £4000. I’ll buy it. In the meantime, drop the price on this experiment and stop calling it a Pro. It doesn’t feel any more Pro than the standard MacBook.

 

 

(Via Six Colors)

This write-up nails every issue I have with the MacBook Pros since the 2016 models were released (and to a lesser extent the MacBook). I’ll wait and see what Apple comes out with later this year before I pull the trigger on a decked out used 2015.

Linux Journal on Scimax

Linux Journal on Scimax:

Over at the Linux Journal, Joey Bernard has a nice article on John Kitchin’s scimax. I’ve written about scimax before but for those who came in late, it’s a collection of Emacs and Org mode tools to make using reproducible research methods for performing and writing about research easier.

If you’re doing research and especially if you’re publishing your results you really should check out scimax. A good way to see what it can do for you is to take a look at its manual or by watching Kitchin’s video

(Via Emacs – Irreal)

I love the stuff John Kitchin has come up with. Bits and bobs can work in your config even if you’re not doing research. 

How do you manage your #InfoSec #CyberSecurity #Privacy #Policy #Security news intake?

I’m in the process of reevaluating my news feeds. The method is much the same as evaluating Cyber Security threat intelligence feeds. Is it:

  • Timely?
  • Accurate?
  • Actionable?
  • Updated?
  • Adding value?

I categorize my information intake in several ways:

  • News
  • Analysis, Editorial & Opinion (most blogs, podcasts, and personal social media feeds)
  • Technical
  • Press releases

With all of this, I find myself overwhelmed with data. Much is redundant and not adding value. Some adds value but isn’t timely. Some opinion is fopped of as news. Branded content permeates.

What sources do you use? How to you consume them? How do you value them?

Work Anniversary

Last week my LinkedIn and email was hit with a bunch of messages congratulating me on my work anniversary. “Huh? What work anniversary are they on about?”

It’s my IBM global one!

I was negligent in forgetting my very move to Big Blue. The work that I did and do, the opportunities at my disposal, and the very fact I live and work in Tokyo amply shows becoming an IBMer was a great move for me.

And the people I work with in Japan and globally are valuable colleagues and, in some wonderful instances, friends.

Happy work birthday to me!

John Young was, and still is, so cool. If you were around in the “Space Race” days or the Shuttle era, he was the astronaut you wanted to be.

https://apple.news/AwEfOt_TpRDaFPOE5ipsojQ