Kit Tweak for iPad as 2nd Display

I use Duet to leverage my iPad (latest generation) as a second, very laggy, display. My employer-issued MacBook Air is hoisted on a Roost laptop stand.

I need something similar for said iPad to get it to an adjustable eye level.

Enter the Spider Monkey! <- Great movie title, by the way.

I’m about to pull the trigger on this based on reviews and direct feedback. Here is the Amazon US link and the Amazon JP link. I will let you know how this works for me.

By the way, I pan to soon update my overall kit post for in the office, on the road, and at the home. Stay Tuned!

Check your email to see if you got duped by a Russian Twitter bot during the 2016 election

https://qz.com/1184593/check-your-email-to-see-if-you-got-duped-by-a-russian-twitter-bot-during-the-us-2016-election/

Seriously, if your vote teetered on the edge and only random Social Media accounts could push you one way or another … you need to retake high school civics &| be brave enough to ask a trusted friend for help.

#Japan is the Contactless Payment Turf War Epicenter

https://atadistance.net/2018/01/20/japan-is-the-contactless-payment-turf-war-epicenter/

What’s interesting is that Global FeliCa support in iPhone 8, iPhone X and Apple Watch 3 lets anybody visiting Japan with those devices add Suica to Apple Pay and instantly enjoy the benefits of Japanese FeliCa contactless payments.

Apple Pay in Japan is the only place in the world where you can mix and match FeliCa and EMV payments side by side with the same device. That’s astonishing, and lots of fun.

I always like Joel’s take on Apple & payments in Japan.

Apple Maps Spot Check #Japan

https://atadistance.net/2018/01/20/apple-maps-spot-check/

Maps tell stories. A simple glance can tell us a lot: what does the map want us to see, what’s important, what’s not, what’s wrong.  Let’s take a look and see what stories Apple, Google and Yahoo Japan maps are telling us.

The maps debate is, unfortunately and oddly, U.S. specific. We all know Google and Apple are based in the U.S. so the best stuff will be local to them.

Most of the world lives elsewhere.

Just Read

From Quartz:

Here’s how much time a single American spends on social media and TV in a year:
608 hours on social media
1642 hours on TV
Wow. That’s 2250 hours a year spent on TRASH. If those hours were spent reading instead, you could be reading over 1,000 books a year!

The numbers are compelling. Arguably, even if one reads within one’s own bubble they will be exposed to thoughts and ideas outside of their preconceived notions simply because no one is 100% dogmatic in exactly the same way.

The impetus for the article is this quote from Warren Buffet, very much de rigueur:

Read 500 pages like this every day. That’s how knowledge works. It builds up, like compound interest. All of you can do it, but I guarantee not many of you will…

I’m on board. While it may seem obvious I will say it anyway: You don’t have to read. Audio books are just as good though harder to underline meaningful passages.

My path and recommendation to you, Dear Reader, is a bit different: Reduce the number of books per year but add in reading the capital-N News daily.

I subscribe to and read the New York Times, the Washington Post (JP), the Japan Times (with which I get the New York Times), and the Guardian (JP Weekly). I also read the Atlantic Monthly (JP) and am thinking about picking up the Economist again, which I used to always look forward to reading each week. Yes, I am that cool.

My big change is moving my news consumption to the evening once I arrive home. I find I get too wound up/depressed/angry when I read the News in the morning, thus ruining my day. Tech news, security news, and bits I need for work I read anytime.

Also I make use of podcasts: NPR hourly news update & Up First, NHK English news, the various APM Marketplaces, The CyberWire, the SANS Internet Storm Center Stormcast, The Daily from the New York Times, and the BBC World Service Newshour. I play these at 1.5 speed or faster with the two security podcasts, NPR hourly update, and the NHK news at the top. I start playing it as I leave the office. By the time home and finished with dinner the podcasts have updated me nicely.

Victimhood in America

The opener to this post by Anil Dash spoke to me:

I keep having to explain a principle I arrived at a few years ago when I realized the modern conservative movement is grounded almost entirely in a contrived sense of grievance, predicated on a false victimhood of its supporters.

I don’t recall the predicate to Mr. Dash’s epiphany. I would like to think I tuned such nonsense out. My indifference boarding on dislike of hip hop is well known to some, so the remainder of the post doesn’t speak to me per se even though the sentiment does.

His assessment is spot on.

However, I would go further. While the Right makes more noise for their contrivances, I’ve seen this victimhood as systemic throughout U.S. society.

We Americans have the luxury of victimhood, of reality TV, of trolling, of burying our heads in the sand, of Tweeting as action (hint: it’s not), and of expecting someone else to fix it.

Scale All #Emacs Windows for Presentations

Scale All Emacs Windows for Presentations:

If you use Emacs in or for your presentations, here’s a nice tip from Robin Green on how to scale all the windows up for better presentation:

 

You’ll have to load Drew Adams’ zoom-frm.el but if you give a lot of presentations where Emacs and its buffers play a significant role, you may find it worthwhile and helpful.

(Via Emacs – Irreal)

I don’t use Emacs for presentations but I wish I did. Maybe it will be my next project? Who knows?

This is a great tip anyway. For example, when I lose or break my glasses, insane zoom will be the only way I can read my Emacs.