(Away from) Home for the Holidays

2016 will be the first time I’m away from the U.S. for Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Eve.

Many years ago I spent both Canadian Thanksgiving and U.S. Thanksgiving around Toronto. Another year I think I was in Austria and Germany at the end of November.

Regular readers and PVC Security podcast listeners know I moved to Tokyo this month.

I don’t particularly care I’ll miss Christmas and New Year’s. I could do without both. Christmas to me means traffic jams and hypo-consumerism. New Year’s is mostly an opportunity to screw up one’s sleep schedule. Unless the calendar is forgiving, all too soon one returns to work.

I used to volunteer to work those holidays, I liked them so little. I won’t miss them here.

Thanksgiving? Well, that’s another thing entirely.

I love the weather in New England and Michigan this time of year. I love well cooked turkey, stuffing, potatoes, gravy, rolls, green beans, etc. I love pumpkin beer (though it’s creep earlier and earlier reduces the draw for me). I love watching football.

Most of all, I love spending it with my family. It can be just me and the kids. It can be the whole clan or something inbetween.

I wonder how I’ll do that day here. Some of my colleagues and friends here have already volunteered to take my mind off of it.

Stay tuned!

And so it begins … in Tokyo

How to follow me on my adventures in Tokyo.

I’m finally here.

The partner leading my consulting practice asked me about moving to Tokyo in December of ’15. I remember I was in my Brussels hotel room just before Christmas when he floated the notion. By February it was more than a mere notion. By April I would be starting “Any Day Now”.

It’s November, week 45 of 2016, and I’m at long last on the ground with all (most all) of my things.

I’m documenting my Tokyo experience, at least the personal side of things, in a few new places.

On Instagram I’m TokyoGringo.

On Twitter, I’m also @TokyoGringo.

On YouTube, I’m not TokyoGringo. I’m just plain old me: pjorgensen.

Follow and comment if you’re so inclined.

T minus 4 days

I’m supposed to be in packing mode. My flight to Tokyo is Wednesday. I need to cram my stuff into 5 bags or less in the next 4 days.

Instead I’m at the Tremont Tavern in Chattanooga while my sister and 67% of her kids attend a birthday party at a park around the corner.

I’m excited by the move, frustrated it’s taken so long, and a bit overwhelmed by the whole thing. It stands to reason I have these mixed emotions.

While I’m packing or not, let me know your big moment ennui. Or toss me some motivational stuff.

Week ending 092516

Quick hits as I re-ramp up my Week Ending posts.

  • Holidays in Japan while I’m back in the States.
  • Great feedback from the client about our work.
  • Wish I’d attended @Derbycon.
  • I’ve been back in Detroit on my return from Tokyo. Spent time with my kids, fun time talking about Tokyo and getting sushi (their idea) and my impending move.
  • A great guest joined us on @pvcsec – Marcelle Lee.
  • Professionally I connected with some new folk and a bunch of friends & colleagues.

Journalism & Ethics

Note: This is a total knee jerk reaction to the tweets & post from The Verge that Chris Ziegler was simultaneously a new Apple employee and an existing The Verge editor covering Apple.

Working for two employers at once isn’t new. It happens all the time.

But you can’t report about company B for company A while also an employee for company B. It’s Journalism 101, a class I took. I know famous corporate blogs and sites occasionally like to blur journalistic lines. This violation, if true, is clear.

Assuming Tim Cook didn’t appear apropos of nothing on Chris Ziegler’s doorstep the day his dual employment began, and nothing in what I’ve read so far indicates an immaculate hiring, The Verge should at least brand every article Chris wrote for the past 6 months as suspect. His motives aren’t known. We can only speculate when Mr. Ziegler entered into discussion and ultimately received the offer to join Apple.

Apple should dismiss Mr. Ziegler if the accusations are true. If he was duplicitous to The Verge management, co-workers, and readers it stands to reason he will be duplicitous to Apple as well. His ethics, at least, are questionable.

If someone I hired knowingly still worked in such a conflict of interest I would fire them for cause. I’d be curious to learn of environments where such action wouldn’t be the norm.

Again, I don’t know all the details or all the facts. If correct, the course for Apple and The Verge is clear.

My latest Thursday, 20160908

It’s a rainy, hurricane #Tokyo today. Yesterday was earthquake Tokyo.
@edgarr0jas and I recorded @pvcsec #EP78. I edited and uploaded #EP77 but the show notes are slow going. Someone deleted last week’s run sheet. No @timothydeblock or @cmaddalena or @infosecsherpa, sadly.
I’ve been diving into #blockchain and #fintech during breaks working on a client deliverable.
I can’t help but chime in on the @apple announcement: I’m glad I bought my iPhone 6s+ a few weeks ago. I think there might be a run on them (https://apple.news/AtodeT67IQiKYmKB2s3fvvA).
Big security day today, product and provider oriented. @Dell finished their @EMCcorp acquisition ( http://www.wsj.com/articles/dell-closes-60-billion-merger-with-emc-1473252540), @HPE sold their enterprise software to @MicroFocus (whomever they are; http://reut.rs/2ckMx4c), and @Intel spun off @McAfee Security (http://www.wsj.com/articles/intel-nears-deal-to-sell-mcafee-security-unit-to-tpg-1473277803).
Oh, and I’m playing around with http://www.dayoneapp.com.

A Bit of Travel

On my way to Tokyo as I write this, taking a break from a lengthy client report due in a few weeks.

I’m appreciative of some things:

Economy+ (or less an exit or lesser a bulkhead seat) makes a big difference for me when on a flight longer than two hours. Detroit to Tokyo and the return make it mandatory for me.

An unoccupied middle seat is wonderful.

A friendly and smaller than me person in the aisle seat makes getting out of my window seat (needed for potential naps, elbow protection, and no cart pummeling) outright delightful.

The 747: my favorite airplane. The 787 and 380 are swell and all. For my money there is nothing like flying this beautiful double-decker. I will fly the lower and upper decks in business/first class before they’re retired.

My new travel kit bag pleases me. Tom Bihn’s customer service is matched by the quality of their products.

Audible books and podcasts on @pocketcasts make the trip entertaining and educational while I write.

Kit & Caboodle: The Series & The List

Want to know what I’m carrying in my consulting bag?

Continue reading “Kit & Caboodle: The Series & The List”

Bad Consultant!

I’ve committed two cardinal sins of consulting: I was, for all intents and purposes, unreachable for several days and I have long lingering outstanding expenses.

I’ll save you, Dear Reader, from any details or explanations or excuses. Instead, I’ll use it as a launching point for composing a list of Consulting Sins.

  1. Discussing the client in public
  2. Posting on-line about the client, especially during client meetings.
  3. Leaving one client’s name & references in a document or presentation for another client.
  4. Abusing expense account and billable hours.
  5. Not being reachable.
  6. Letting expenses accumulate.
  7. Failing to submit billable hours on-time.
  8. Over promising and under delivering.
  9. Booking yourself in two places at once.
  10. Lack of preparation.
  11. Don’t proof read, peer review, spell check, and grammar check things going in front of the client.
  12. Overestimate the amount of time you have to deliver anything – you never have enough time.

I’m sure there are more. One colleague of mine would definitely include failing to carry a stain remover. Add your recommended cardinal consulting sins in the comments.

Ad hoc operations in the SOC can lead to pain | Me on IDG.TV

At CircleCityCon, CSO’s Steve Ragan chats with Paul Jorgensen, host of the PVC Security Podcast, about ad hoc processes within many security operations centers (SOCs) and how organizations can prevent these types of mistakes.

Source: Ad hoc operations in the SOC can lead to pain | IDG.TV

I relished talking with Steve Ragan at CircleCityCon in Indianapolis last weekend (Saturday 11 June 2016). He recorded us in a bite-sized elevator-pitch of a summary of a key point or two of my talk, “Top 10 Mistakes in Security Operations Centers, Incident Handling, and Incident Response”.

Yes, our first take failed. We were joined then by Chris Maddalena, my co-host from the PVC Security podcast. Chris couldn’t be bothered to join us for the redo, probably because he was busy winning the whole conference or something.

Not only was I moments away from my talk as Steve mentioned in the open; I left straight from my session to the airport en route to Tokyo for work. You can’t see my luggage lurking behind me in the video.

Many thanks to Steve and IDG.tv for having me on. It was fun, deja vu included.

p.s. – I think the rhyme in the title could have been exploited more #justsayin