I can’t agree more:

Social media is as compelling as ever, but people are increasingly souring on the surveillance state Skinner boxes like Facebook and Twitter. Decentralized media like blogs and newsletters are looking better and better these days…

From kottke.org.

The article has some great sites to add to the RSS reader as well.

I’m buying in to the push away from the behemoths but they still play a role in getting the word out around content.

I like my site. I write it for me, often times as a bit of my exocortex. But if others enjoy it or find value, so much the better. I like the quote Jason has in his piece from someone named Kari:

I also keep it out of spite, because I refuse to let social media take everything. Those shapeless, formless platforms haven’t earned it and don’t deserve it. I’ve blogged about this many times, but I still believe it: When I log into Facebook, I see Facebook. When I visit your blog, I see you.

She wrote it far better than I.

Also on:

On June 19, Twitter has said it will be disabling “streaming services,” which is how third-party apps like Tweetbot and Twitterrific can stream the timeline and send push notifications. The replacement, the Account Activity API is not available to third-party developers …

From 512pixels.net.

If this plays out the way it seems at the moment, this might not work out the way Twitter hopes it will. This feels like a monetization play.

I know of only one person in my circle who prefers the default Twitter client experience. As “The Most Interesting Man in the World” might say, “I don’t always visit Twitter. But when I do, I prefer Tweetbot.”

The third party developers of Twitter clients Twitterific, Tweetbot, Tallon, and Tweetings have a website on the topic and there’s an associated hashtag campaign. These efforts impacted Twitter’s plans at least to delay implementation.

“Stay tweety, my friends”?

Further reading

I find myself spending time consuming content – the Web via RSS feeds (yes, they’re still in use), streaming video, and on-line radio (real radio stations and not streaming audio).

I don’t find myself creating content – on my various web sites or presentations or in social media – as much as I’d like. Sure, I podcast & tweet & G+ update & so on.

“What’s the ratio?”

I asked myself this today out of nowhere. It’s a simple question: “What’s my ratio of content consumed to content created?”

What’s reasonable? 50/50 is absurd. Maybe 10% my content to 90% consumption is a workable fraction?

Even a 1/9 ratio is absurd based on my RSS feeds. I receive over 1000 posts a day. There’s no way I can generate 10 posts per day.

Of those 1K posts, there are maybe 200 in which I show an interest. Of those, how many are tweet-able because I find them interesting but not interesting enough to write a post? Let’s say 180.

That being the case, is my issue more process than content?

I don’t have an answer. Not yet, anyway.

Thoughts?