Jail site for Detroit soccer stadium will cost a pretty penny, says county | MLive

Is a jail really what the city needs greeting incoming traffic at one of the main entryways to Downtown Detroit?

Answer: No

That’s what Detroit real estate mogul Dan Gilbert asked Wednesday.

Wayne County Executive Warren Evans said Gilbert and Detroit Pistons owner Tom Gores need to show Evans the money if he’s going to move the unfinished jail project, though.

Gilbert on Wednesday rolled out conceptual renderings and hype videos for a new soccer stadium — and team — in Downtown Detroit.

They want to build it right on Gratiot Avenue, at the site of the stagnant Wayne County Jail project that sits, charmlessly, across from the county courthouse near Greektown.

Source: Jail site for Detroit soccer stadium will cost a pretty penny, says county | MLive

I don’t know the full details of the funding, specifically how much public money would be poured into what is essentially a private endeavor, but Wayne County needs a serious reality check. Their jail is massively over budget and nowhere near completed.

This proposed new development project is basically a “get out of jail free” card, no pun intended. It’s the county’s fault the project failed so far. Getting 20 cents on the dollar, even in their financially strapped state, is better than they deserve. Plus, they’ll stop throwing money into the pit.

I don’t live in Wayne County; if I did, I’d be actively campaigning for the executive team’s ouster, starting with Evans.

I will put in the vote for the Detroit MSL franchise to be the Detroit Arsenal, obviously!

The Dixie Highway & Me

I’m pretty sure my interest in the Dixie Highway began with wondering why there were so many Dixie Highway exits from I-75 in Southeastern Michigan.

My interest in highways and roads started earlier when I was a teen living in Connecticut. Roads and highways throughout New England have colorful histories. Official sites only hint at the local legend and lore. Rich tapestries woven of family histories, geological realities, pre-Revolution decisions, and “because” shaped the paths that became the highways of New England.

Yet that’s not where I started.

Interstate 84 runs through Connecticut connecting Pennsylvania and New York with Massachusetts. It’s a remarkably dull road, no doubt a tribute to its efficiency.

After my family moved to Connecticut in the late 1980s, we traversed that ribbon of concrete many times. I paid keen attention to one sign along the way, a sign that made no sense yet fascinated me to no end.

“I-84 Ends, I-86 to Boston”

It was still I-84 and remains so to this day. Somewhere I have pictures of the I-86 signage in Connecticut, which I think persisted until the 1990s. There’s a whole history behind this – the highway near my house that wasn’t. It kicked off my interest in roads and highways.

Toss in family dynamics – paternal side are Yankees (though didn’t arrive in the US until the 1920-1930s; settling in Michigan, Wisconsin & Minnesota) and maternal side are Dixie (I won’t call them Rebels or Confederates as there’s no documentation my family fought in the Civil War). Come 2000 and I & mine live within a mile of Woodward Avenue.

My interest in the Dixie Highway becomes more clear.

I think.

$21M Dequindre Cut connecting miles of land in Detroit opens Friday | MLive.com

Good stuff. I can’t wait to check it out!

The Dequindre Cut Greenway extension officially opens April 29.

The extension has been in the works since 2013, with the opening pushed back multiple times.

According to a release from Link Detroit, the $21-million project “connects 20 miles of continuous walking and biking paths linking Downtown, Midtown, Detroit Riverfront, Eastern Market and Hamtramck.”

Source: $21M Dequindre Cut connecting miles of land in Detroit opens Friday | MLive.com

Me @ CircleCityCon, Talkin’ SOC

Dear Friends,

I’m honored to present at CircleCityCon 2016 on Saturday at 16:00 on “Top 10 Mistakes in Security Operations Centers, Incident Handling & Response” and how to avoid them (https://circlecitycon.com/talks/)

I’m excited by the opportunity and can’t wait to see you there (tickets: https://circlecitycon.com/tickets/). Stop by and say ‘hi’!

I might just have a PVC Security cohort or two around, so don’t be surprised if a PVC Security podcast episode happens.

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Let’s Encrypt is actually encrypting the whole Web

Let’s Encrypt is actually encrypting the whole Web:

free-ssl-certificate

Let’s Encrypt (previously) a joint EFF-Mozilla-Linux Foundation project that lets anyone easily create an SSL certificate for free in minutes and install and configure it so that visitors to their Websites will be shielded from surveillance, came out of beta this week, and it’s already making a huge difference. (more…)

(Via Boing Boing)

Need I say more than I’m a fan & a user? 

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Your Elders’ InfoSec on 60 Minutes Sun 17.04.2016

It looks like the Columbia Broadcasting System‘s 60 Minutes program will cover wireless hacking this Sunday, 17 April 2016 at 19:00 EDT.

You may need to retcon what they see on 60 Minutes with what they’ve seen over and over again on NCIS and CSI. If you’re lucky, your family also watches Elementary and The Good Wife, CBS shows that keep most of their technobabble close to reality.

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BADLOCK – Are ‘Branded’ Exploits Going Too Far? A: Yes!

BADLOCK – Are ‘Branded’ Exploits Going Too Far?:

So there’s been hype about this big exploit coming, for over a month, before anything was released. It had a name, a website and a logo – and it was called Badlock.

And now it’s out, and it’s more like Sadlock – really a local network DoS against DCE/RPC services on Windows and Linux with some slight chance of pulling off a MiTM. No remote code exeuction, not even privilege escalation.

Microsoft hasn’t even labelled it as critical, merely important.

Crucial? As it was marketed, hardly.

There is a whole list of CVE’s related, none of them are really critical.

Another questionable point is that the person who ‘discovered’ these bugs, is a member of Samba Core Team..and works on Samba.

So it’s like hey, here’s a bunch of vulnerabilities I found in my own software, let’s make a logo for them and give them a name (which doesn’t even really related to the vulns).

So yah there’s nothing really wrong with branding a vulnerability, to get awareness about something critical – get press coverage and get people fixing it. But this? This is a minor bug, with no real major production impact, only exploitable over a LAN which at words allows for a MiTM.

A saw a great quote on Twitter..it went something like:

“All these names for exploits are getting confusing and can be hard to remember/categorise – soon we’ll need to invent some kinda system that assigns numbers to vulnerabilities…”

LOL indeed.

Are these bugs important enough to patch? Oh yes, absolutely. Did they need a month of marketing, a logo and a name to raise awareness? Absolutely not. They could have slid into regular, automated patch updates along with all other ‘important’ patches.

It could have been a interesting story about a whole series of bugs in SAMBA, but it became a huge discussion about the Badlock clownshow. Sad.

(Via Darknet – The Darkside)

I can’t agree with this article more. It’s a great read. I didn’t mean to quote quite so much, but I get a hoot out of the story.

We spoke about this on PVC Security podcast when the story first broke. It looks like most if not all of our predictions came true.

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