IBM Watson Summit 2016 Japan Talk: Building a Next Generation SOC on Hybrid Cloud

The event organizers honored me with an invitation to speak at the IBM Watson Summit 2016 here in Tokyo. My talk, Building a Next Generation SOC on Hybrid Cloud, was (I think) well received.

The talk covered many items: why we build these things called SOC; what is the next generation of SOC; how can we move toward it; how can we leverage a hybrid model and cloud tools to enable the transition. I can’t share the deck. The presentation was not recorded, though cameras captured me in action quite often. Glad I was looking sharp!

It’s been a while since I presented with simultaneous translation into another language. The translators were great. By all accounts they captured not only my words but a bit of my passion and energy.

I’m not sure how my audience received the message. Crowds didn’t up and leave. No one fell asleep, something of a victory for a 4PM talk on day 3. About 130 of an expected 200 showed up. All in all, I think it went well.

I wish there was a question and answer session or a time for Sato-san and me to answer questions one-on-one.

I want to thank my colleague, Sato Takuya, for introducing me and closing out the session. I wish I knew the names of the translators to talk them by name as well.

p.s. – If you are an event organizer and you chose lanyard-attached name tags, please print the information on both sides of the insert card!

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Big TWC outage: Fiber cuts take out service for 750,000 in NYC area | Ars Technica

I like how the construction crew waited for my trip to NYC to cut the lines.

Accidental fiber cuts caused by construction workers took out telecommunications service for more than 750,000 customers in the New York City area yesterday.

There’s a technical term for this: fiber-seeking backhoe.

The fiber cuts hit the network of Level 3, an Internet backbone provider, and lasted for hours before being fixed. Problems hit several states: customer reports on DownDetector indicate that outages primarily affected Time Warner Cable (TWC) in New York and Cox Communications in large parts of Connecticut and Rhode Island and small parts of Massachusetts. Level 3’s network serves both TWC and Cox.

Think about this for a moment – one local event impacted people and businesses in 4 states. Remember, Level 3 is an Internet backbone provider. More than cable TV runs over their infrastructure.

The most specific outage numbers came from New York. The New York Department of Public Service (NYDPS) issued a statement saying that “more than 750,000 customers in the New York City area were unable to complete telephone calls.” Most or all of those customers are apparently Time Warner Cable users. Internet and TV service was also affected.

Level 3 confirmed the outage, telling CNN and other media outlets, “Our network is experiencing service disruptions affecting some of our customers with operations in the Northeastern United States due to a fiber cut caused by third-party construction. Our technicians are on site and working to restore service.” Time Warner Cable said the outage was caused by “multiple fiber cuts at one of our network providers.”

The NYDPS statement noted that Level 3 provides service to both TWC and Verizon in New York. But Verizon’s network did not suffer any problems related to the Level 3 trouble yesterday, a Verizon spokesperson told Ars.

Source: Big TWC outage: Fiber cuts take out service for 750,000 in NYC area | Ars Technica

Back in my Network Manager days my team and I spent a lot of effort making as certain as possible our major links – primarily our backbone and Internet connections – were truly redundant and diverse. Not only would we rarely rely upon a single provider (and Level 3 was one of those) but we would require geographic diversity as well.

For example, when I procured redundant backbone connectivity for a co-location center in Detroit, one circuit came from the East around Lake Erie and the other came from Chicago in the West.

In order to achieve this I worked hard on the contract language to place my employer in the best position possible while my engineers made sure the providers understood and deployed what we ordered. Even then, you never know when some rerouting might occur where once diverse paths now traverse a single MUX in an out-of-the-way unstaffed switching station.

Setting aside such edge cases, it is not only possible but the responsibility of an organization to make sure there’s as much Redundancy, Diversity, Reliability, Depth, and Simplicity (RDRDS) in the environment as practical without breaking the bank.

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The Role of Highways in American Poverty

If part of a body is sick, the whole body can’t be healthy, and many cities across America have parts that aren’t doing very well. But there are regions that are trying to become healthier by coming together, rather than pulling apart. Tearing down a highway can be one way to do this. But it’s not the only way. My colleague Derek Thompson has written about the miracle of Minneapolis, where high-income communities share tax revenues and real estate with lower-income communities to spread prosperity. A year ago, I visited Louisville, where a court ordered the county and city to combine their school districts in order to integrate their schools. Today, Louisville is still trying to keep its county and city schools integrated, even after the Supreme Court told the city it no longer had to do so. In Chicago, a regional housing authority that covers eight counties, including Cook County, is working to move families from the inner city to higher-opportunity neighborhoods. Some cities use inclusive zoning, in which all new construction must include a certain percentage of housing for low-income residents, which means that the wealthy can’t separate themselves from the poor.

Source: The Role of Highways in American Poverty

M-1 Rail opens Penske Tech Center; first Qline cars will be in Detroit by fall | MLive.com

I’m ready for M1 Rail to be up and running so the city and region can talk about extending it up Woodward Avenue into Oakland County, or at least to 8 Mile.

M-1 Rail CEO Matt Cullen joined M-1 Board Chairman Roger Penske and state and city officials to open the 19,000-square-foot Penske Tech Center in Detroit’s North End neighborhood, where a little more information on the 3.3-mile rail loop was outlined.

Cullen said the Qline cars should be running on Woodward Avenue by spring 2017. That leaves a bit of cushion to the winter 2017 deadline the rail was bumped to last year.

Everything is on schedule, though, Cullen said.

Source: M-1 Rail opens Penske Tech Center; first Qline cars will be in Detroit by fall | MLive.com