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NASA Just Released Two Years’ Worth of Apollo 11 Mission Audio

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Why Carbs Don’t Make You Fat | The Art of Manliness

Why Carbs Don’t Make You Fat | The Art of Manliness
— Read on www.artofmanliness.com/articles/why-carbs-dont-make-you-fat/

To;dr – it’s boring old calories across the food spectrum that make us fat, not carbs all on their own.

This is a very long yet information dense read. I recommend it if for no other reason than describing Brett’s original view (low carb FTW!) and how he advocated that stance only to allow himself to be persuaded away from it by science. It’s a sadly uncommon bit of bravery to be willing and able to change one’s own mind.

This does back up my anecdotal observations in Japan where they eat the diet ultimately recommended here: high (healthy, low processed) carbohydrates, low fat, and moderate protein all in modest caloric intake. They do other things, like eating family-style when eating out in a group, that help to keep the calories down.

My own eating further backs this up in my own mind: when I eat a largely Japanese diet my weight drops; when I eat a modern American diet my weight increases.

Ultimately, Michael Pollen summed it up best:

Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.

As always, YMMV.

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DHS vulnerability scanning program offline after Virginia office loses power

DHS vulnerability scanning program offline after Virginia office loses power:

Two cybersecurity programs the Department of Homeland Security offers both states and the private sector have been temporarily knocked offline due to a power outage, while other services have been shifted to backup locations, multiple sources tell CyberScoop.

The National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC), the 24/7 hub for monitoring cyberthreats across the government and critical infrastructure, has shifted operations to a backup location in Florida. The move was made after the Arlington, Virginia, building that houses NCCIC lost power last week due to heavy rains.

Additionally, two other programs under NCCIC’s National Cybersecurity Assessments and Technical Services (NCATS) — Cyber Hygiene vulnerability scans and Phishing Campaign Assessment — have been offline since July 26.

The Cyber Hygiene program remotely detects known vulnerabilities on internet-facing services. The Phishing Campaign Assessment program is part of a remote penetration testing service. Both programs are used by hundreds of customers across the country. Thirty-four states have received vulnerability scans through the Cyber Hygiene program, according to a DHS presentation given at the National Association of State Election Directors summer conference.

DHS Assistant Secretary for Cybersecurity and Communications Jeanette Manfra told CyberScoop that the disruption to Cyber Hygiene is temporary, and that election systems will be the first to resume service once the program comes back online. Officials expect scans to resume Aug. 6.

The building housing NCCIC suffered heavy damage on when portions of the façade ruptured due to the volume of rain that fell in the Washington, D.C., region. The roof of a restaurant on the building’s ground level failed during business hours on July 26.

… A number of DHS offices are in that building.

CyberScoop has learned that due to the water damage, the building completely lost power, which prevented server rooms used by DHS from staying cool. Once the room reached a certain temperature, a sprinkler system was activated. Those sprinklers damaged servers supporting the Cyber Hygiene and Phishing Campaign Assessment programs.

On Sunday, the NCATS office sent an email to its customers informing them that Cyber Hygiene and Phishing Campaign Assessment were offline and that contingency plans have been put in place.

“In order to minimize the operational impact, we immediately implemented our contingency plans and transferred functions to other sites, including NPPD’s facility in Pensacola, Fla.,” the email, obtained by CyberScoop, reads. “We are working to restore these services as quickly as possible. We will let you know when the service and reports will resume.”

NPPD is the National Protection and Programs Directorate, which oversees NCCIC.

The power outage has had a “minimal impact” on DHS’s cybersecurity operations, Krebs said. The incident has not, for example, affected the department’s ability to respond to cyber incidents or issue warnings to the private sector.

DHS has been at the center of the federal government’s efforts to fortify U.S. voting infrastructure following the 2016 presidential election, when Russian hackers probed systems in 21 states. Last week it was revealed that the same outfit of Russian hackers that meddled in the 2016 election appears to have targeted  Sen. Claire McCaskill‘s office.

(Via Cyberscoop)

With the DHS looking to create a central Risk Management program, seeing stories like this does not instill confidence that the U.S. Government, and the DHS in particular, are up to the challenge.

This slays me:

Chris Krebs, the undersecretary of NPPD, told CyberScoop that the department is “taking this opportunity to get some efficiencies into the system, but also to build resilience and redundancy.”

Those are the words uttered after every such event.

By the way for those not in the know, there is a well-known process call Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity Planning (DR/BCP) that has been around for decades to plan for just this sort of event.

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Maybe the National Risk Management Center Will Combat Critical Infrastructure Hacks

The National Risk Management Center Will Combat Critical Infrastructure Hacks:

At a cybersecurity summit Tuesday, Homeland Security secretary Kirstjen Nielsen announced the creation of the National Risk Management Center, which will focus on evaluating threats and defending US critical infrastructure against hacking. The center will focus on the energy, finance, and telecommunications sectors to start, and DHS will conduct a number of 90-day “sprints” throughout 2018 in an attempt to rapidly build out the center’s processes and capabilities.

“We are reorganizing ourselves for a new fight,” Nielsen said on Tuesday, who described the new center as a “focal point” for cybersecurity within the federal government. Nielsen also noted that DHS is working with members of Congress on organizational changes that can be mandated by law to improve DHS’s effectiveness and reach.

(Via Security Latest)

Based on the recent news from the Boston Globe about TSA wasting resources on zero value “security”, I am skeptical of how useful this will be in the U.S. Government’s security efforts. I seem to recall something similar was in the works over a decade ago.

However, Secretary Nelson seems to have said the right things in her talk:

  • Risk-based approach
  • Threat evaluation versus threat chasing
  • Focused on specific critical industries
  • Taking an agile development approach to building out capabilities
  • Working with Congress
  • Being the focal point for government

There are unanswered questions. We will get more answers as the process moves along.

I sincerely hope this isn’t another Security Theater opportunity to waste time and taxpayer resources.

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