Mistakes, chatter, and showing up:

The more time we spend trying to build new things or get work that matters done, the more mistakes we are inevitable going to make.

I’ve come to realize that the key is to not let the chatter (both external and internal) about the mistakes and the stuff that is broken to get in the way of showing up every day with enthusiasm.

Every day, we get the opportunity to solve puzzles that involve continually prioritizing between fixing what’s broken, plugging short term gaps, and investing in the long term. We get to do this in our products, in our communities, in our families, and within ourselves.

We (and what we build) are always going to be work in progress. Once we accept that, it follows that the best thing we can do is to make the most of that opportunity and continue to earn it every day.

In the long run, it turns out that becoming is far more important than being.

(Via A Learning a Day)

Wow. That’s … not relatable for a lot of people, IT or otherwise.

My takeaways? Show up and learn from mistakes instead of letting them get in your way. If the rest applies, that’s gravy.

Laptop holding techniques in the office — Quartz at Work:

They walk among us in just about every office: People with their laptops open, bound for conference rooms and common areas, many keeping their devices ajar to avoid losing those precious few seconds of computer wake-up time.

While we cloak our phones in shock-proof plastic and their screens with tempered-glass shields, laptops rarely get similar protection. Considering these pieces of hardware are some of the most expensive items we work with, it’s a little shocking to see how cavalier we can be toward our one essential work device.

But since when has safety outweighed looking cool?

Over the past few weeks, we’ve been observing Quartzians in their natural habitat and have tried to make sense of their odd office rituals in porting their laptops from one meeting to the next. Here are some of our findings.

This is some silly fun. I know which one I am (“The Clutch”) and which I’d like to be (“The Vacationer”).

I’m working on improving my health. Lifehacker has what I think might be a useful post:

Where to Start When You Want to Optimize Your Health:

Exercise, any kind

You can run, lift weights, do yoga, take classes—there are tons of options. Any exercise is better than none, and if you’re feeling out of shape, try doing a little more than whatever you’re currently doing.

A healthy week’s worth of exercise should include:

Some cardio
Some strength training

You might be a runner who gets in a few quick strength sessions, or a lifter who hops on the rower for a little cardio once or twice a week. Or maybe you play a sport that gives you a good mix of both in every practice.

If you’re new to everything, explore until you find something you love.

Here’s the problem: there is no form of exercise that I love.

I’m someone who played three sports in high school, played a bunch of intramural at uni, and even played soe semi-organized soccer and hockey (ice and roller blade) as an adult. I like to hike. I like to swim. I like to bike. I will lift weights or use a machine. I will hop on a treadmill.

Love enters into none of my exercise equation. I’ve never experienced any kind of “high” from exercise or sports. I even ran cross country for a hot minute in high school and stopped because it was such a slog and boring.

More sleep and less garbage food & stress – those I get behind whole heartedly.

jwz: Infocom:

Jason Scott just posted all of the Infocom source, which is glorious!

<TELL “The ” D ,GLASS-CASE ” is “> <TELL “open”>) (T <TELL “closed”>)> ) ( >> ) (<VERB? MUNG> )>>

Zarf summarizes:

“This material has been kicking around for a while now. If you search for articles about “the Infocom drive”, you’ll see some discussion from years past. Actually, don’t do that, it’s mostly old arguments that don’t need to be rehashed.

The point is that a great deal of historical information about Infocom has been preserved — but it’s not publicly archived. You can’t go research it anywhere. Nobody admits to having it, because it’s “proprietary IP”, and you’re not supposed to trade in that stuff because companies like Activision make the rules.

So when Jason puts this information online, he’s taking a stance. The stance is: history matters. Copyright is a balance between the rights of the owner to profit and the rights of the public to investigate, discuss, and increase the sphere of culture. Sometimes the balance needs a kick.

Quite possibly all these repositories will be served with takedown requests tomorrow. I’m downloading local copies for myself tonight, just in case.”

If you’re in a mirroring mood:

curl “https://api.github.com/users/historicalsource/repos?page=1&per_page=100″ | grep git_url | cut -d \” -f 4 | xargs -L1 git clone

Read on for a fun fact.