# cerise

## Noun

1. a red the color of ripe cherries
– Synonyms
– cherry
– cherry red
– Less specific
– red
– redness
– Related
– red
– reddish
– ruddy
– blood-red
– carmine
– cerise
– cherry
– cherry-red
– crimson
– ruby
– ruby-red
– scarlet
– red
– reddish
– ruddy
– blood-red
– carmine
– cerise
– cherry
– cherry-red
– crimson
– ruby
– ruby-red
– scarlet

## Adjective

1. of a color at the end of the color spectrum (next to orange); resembling the color of blood or cherries or tomatoes or rubies
– Synonyms
– red
– reddish
– ruddy
– blood-red
– carmine
– cherry
– cherry-red
– crimson
– ruby
– ruby-red
– scarlet
– Similar to
– chromatic
– Related
– scarlet
– vermilion
– orange red
– crimson
– ruby
– deep red
– cerise
– cherry
– cherry red
– cerise
– cherry
– cherry red
– cardinal
– carmine
– ruddiness
– rosiness
– red
– redness
– red
– redness

Peace Communications announces its sponsorship of the local Chattanooga Weatherphone service.

The trusted service has been a part of the Chattanooga community since the 1960s and still receives a daily average of 4,000 to 5,000 calls, according to Randall Hinton, spokesman for The Weatherphone Company.

The number, 423-265-1411, will remain the same going forward, and Peace will use its own Hosted PBX Infrastructure to add additional overflow numbers to handle the fluctuating call volume.

“The service was on the verge of going away forever if the Weatherphone Company didn’t find a new sponsor,” said Jim Peace, founder, and CEO of Peace Communications. “We are happy to step in and support this valuable community service for Chattanooga and surrounding Hamilton County.”

Yay!

Also, I didn’t know we had a weatherphone. Analog FTW!

Recorded lunch with Orson Welles in 1983:

Orson Welles: I hate Woody Allen physically, I dislike that kind of man.

Henry Jaglom: I’ve never understood why. Have you met him?

O.W.: Oh, yes. I can hardly bear to talk to him. He has the Chaplin disease. That particular combination of arrogance and timidity sets my teeth on edge.

H.J.: He’s not arrogant; he’s shy.

O.W.: He is arrogant. Like all people with timid personalities, his arrogance is unlimited. Anybody who speaks quietly and shrivels up in company is unbelievably arrogant. He acts shy, but he’s not. He’s scared. He hates himself, and he loves himself, a very tense situation. It’s people like me who have to carry on and pretend to be modest. To me, it’s the most embarrassing thing in the world—a man who presents himself at his worst to get laughs, in order to free himself from his hang-ups. Everything he does on the screen is therapeutic.

(Via Laura Olin & via Jason Kottke)

We’ve become a nation so afraid of everything that we just lash out erratically, hoping big shows of strength will somehow keep the scary things at bay. On one level, that observation is depressingly true — and the Trump years only exacerbated that reality, as immigrants and other persecuted groups were held up as scapegoats for the country’s dumbest citizens to demonize. Hell, “Evil dies tonight” could have been a rallying cry the former president’s supporters yelled at, say, journalists. 

(Tim Grierson via Mel Magazine)

It is probably worth explaining here not only that it is bad to send a story to a source for pre-publication review, but why it is bad. While I assure you this is not normal practice, and is indeed right up there as one of the basic tenets of journalism along with “spell people’s names correctly” and “don’t make shit up,” and that all reporters know not to do it (both innately and from having it drilled into their heads by competent and ethical instructors, colleagues, and bosses), there is no reason a normal person would ever spend a minute thinking about it. But it’s not some arcane, ivory-tower, j-school ethical holdover; it’s common sense. Every source for every story is by definition an interested party, and their interest is in the story being reported in a certain way. That’s not necessarily intentional or nefarious, but it’s without exception—why else would they talk to a reporter? They want something out there, and they want it to be their version. That’s a conflict of interest that’s unavoidably inherent in the very idea of sourcing. This doesn’t mean that sources shouldn’t be trusted, but it does mean that they should not be the final arbiter of the story’s content—especially when, as was the case here, the story was one about a conflict between two sides, and only one side was handed the rubber stamp.

(via the Defector)

Unless other egregious examples of journalistic ethical lapses come to light I do not thing Schefter should get the shaft. J-school students should take this as an example of what not to do.

Amazon unveils Astro, a mobile robot with a 10-inch display, meant to roam around the house; officials say the device combines Amazon’s work in robotics, AI, speech and visual recognition, cloud computing, and more (More) | See the company’s other new offerings revealed at its fall product event (More)

(Via 1440 Daily Digest)

Yikes!!! As if what Amazon is doing with … everything … isn’t creepy enough, they unleash a robotic minder.

No more questions: Lakers superstar LeBron James said he got the COVID-19 vaccine.

“I think everyone has their own choice to do what they feel is right for themselves and their family, and things of that nature. I know that I was very [skeptical] about it all. But after doing my research, and things of that nature, I felt like it was best suited for not only me but for my family and for my friends, and that’s why I decided to do it.”

(Via SI)

First, I want to know what research and “things of that nature” were included in this celebrity athletic person’s research and how they were different from the “things of that nature” for everyone else and their family.

Second, no. There are choices people can make for themselves and their families that only materially impact them and no one else. COVID-19 vaccinations, or influenza or polio or measles or a host of other entirely manageable conditions are as much about the protection the vaccinated give to those who cannot themselves be protected. It’s not a local-to-me issue and never was.

Stop couching “Look at me! I got the shot!” with personal choice BS.

Or look someone who is immunocompromised in the (virtual) face and explain to them how it is a personal choice.

LeBron James can, for a multitude of sins, go fuck himself. This one can go to the top.

Third, who is writing James’ copy?

Police Blotter: Man Who Is “Too High” Aggressively Plays Instruments At Guitar Center; Man And Woman Hit Each Other With Hair Iron:

Police responded to a disorder at the Guitar Center on Hamilton Place Boulevard. The manager told police that a black male, wearing a black baseball hat with an American flag, blue shirt with stars and jeans, came into the business and began aggressively playing the drums and other instruments, causing a scene. She said she asked him if he could continue playing the instruments in a more calm manner. He said he was “too high” and began to argue with her, at which point she asked him to leave. She said she wanted him trespassed from the property, but he was no longer on scene for police to do so.

* * *

A man on Ivy Street told police that a woman had taken his phone and driven away. The man had two cuts on his hand that he said the woman gave him with a hair iron. He said that she was driving him home, and when they arrived at his grandparents’ house, he asked her to take him to another address. He said she refused to take him anywhere else, and when he exited the vehicle and went inside, he realized that his phone was gone. He called police and then began chasing the woman on foot. He said when he caught up with her to retrieve his phone, she got her hair iron from the trunk and struck him with it. He said he then grabbed it from her hand and hit her in the leg. The man said he did not want to press any charges. The woman told police that when they arrived at his grandparents’ house, he refused to get out of the vehicle and requested to be taken to his friend’s house. She said she refused and he took the keys from the ignition and ran out of the car. She said she then chased him around the house to get the keys back and returned to her vehicle, opened the trunk and retrieved her hair iron. She said that at some point he struck her and she retrieved the iron to hit him. She said he then took it from her and hit her on the front of her leg. The woman was unwilling to show police her injury or take a picture of it. She had no other injuries or bruising. She did not want to press any charges against him. She pulled up in her vehicle shortly after police arrived on scene. The man’s phone was in her vehicle and it was returned to him. As there were no witnesses to the event, both of them admitted to striking the other, and neither was willing to press charges in a mutual combative instance, both of them left the area separately and stated they would not be contacting each other.

Johnson & Johnson, the one-and-done vaccine, was supposed to be the easy way out of COVID. Instead, it became a kind of purgatory.
— Read on nymag.com/intelligencer/2021/09/johnson-and-johnson-and-regret.html

But after months of confusion, there remains more or less radio silence on the J&J question from those famously effective communicators at the CDC and FDA.

Ha!