The sky, black with lawyers

jwz on How to fix social media:

What we need is this one simple trick:

A site that scrapes, collates, and de-dups your friends’ posts on every social media site, and then shows you the union of all of those posts as one feed.

This is the only way to break Facebook’s back: to allow your friends’ transition from one social network’s data silo to another to be so gradual and effortless that you don’t even notice it happening.

The thing that makes this difficult, of course, is not the coding, but the fact that if you succeed at it in any meaningful way, the sky will blacken with lawyers, and the data silos’ spending on technical countermeasures will absolutely smother you.

Sadly, people have little agency in all of this. Social Media’s End User License Agreements (EULA) and Terms of Service (TOS) make that clear.

Hurtful language hurts politicians

United States Senator Bill Hagerty on Tuesday joined Senator Tom Cotton (R-AR) and nine other colleagues to introduce the Public Servant Protection Act, which protects public officials and employees and their families from having their home addresses displayed publicly online. Text of the bill may be found here. …

United States Senator Bill Hagerty on Tuesday joined Senator Tom Cotton (R-AR) and nine other colleagues to introduce the Public Servant Protection Act, which protects public officials and employees and their families from having their home addresses displayed publicly online. Text of the bill may be found here.

(Via Chattanoogan.com)

That’s not how free speech works.

Should public servants and their families be protected by law enforcement? Yes. We all should, and those serving in office should get protection specific to their role as the vitriol is particularly incendiary and the service they provide is important.

Should government officials be sheltered from voters who disagree with them, those who say things they don’t like, in a peaceful manner? No. If the voices are dangerous? Yes.

Should journalists and news outlets couch political grandstanding as “protection” from “threats”? No.

Should public employee addresses be public record? That’s not clear cut. I think elected officials should have their addresses on record since their residence is part of the requirement to hold office. If public service employees, like fire and police, are required to live in their community, then that should be public record as well.

Of course, this is largely moot. Most everyone volunteers their location on social media. It would not take much work to figure out where a public servant lives based on posts by themselves, their significant others, or their offspring.

Lawn care specialists, house cleaning professionals, au pairs, and the like could also post location information.

Maybe neighbors post their own information and it becomes easy to triangulate a voted-on public servant’s house?

For those interested in reducing your social media use, here’s an idea I’m trying to improve/regain my ability to focus:

  1. Open Instapaper (or other reader app of choice).

  2. Sort articles shortest-to-longest.

  3. Read. 

This could help.

(Via Patrick Rhone)

And Now, Elon Musk

I don’t need to tell you who he is. … Think of him as the ultimate troll. A billion-dollar troll. King of the Trollkin, that guy.

Maybe he’ll do right by Twitter. Maybe he’ll make it better. Or maybe he’ll give it autopilot and it’ll crash into an orphanage. I’m betting on the latter.

The question is, what do you do about it?

I don’t know.

I really don’t.

(Via Chuck Wendig)

Punching him in his very punchable face is not an option, sadly.

I’ll continue to use the service as a way of altering folks to my musings here (and my new endeavor — stay tuned).

Some reading material, if you care to have it:

Fonda Lee: Twitter Is The Worst Reader

Kacen Callendar: The Humanization Of Authors

Caitlin Flanagan: You Really Need To Quit Twitter

And finally, something else from me (I know, sorry): Does Social Media Sell Books? A Vital Inquisition!

Marriage Story

“He’s both a pas­sion­ate believer and in­tense critic of the service which is ex-actly what we need on @Twitter, and in the board­room, to make us stronger in the long-term. Wel­come Elon!” Mr. Agrawal tweeted.

Mr. Musk tweeted: “Looking for­ward to work­ing with Parag & Twit­ter board to make sig­nif­i­cant improve­ments to Twit­ter in com­ing months!”

(Via WSJ; by Sara E. Needleman and Meghan Bobrowsky)

I watched moviesthis weekend for my Introduction to Film Studies class. One of them was Marriage Story (2019).

It opens with each of Scarlett Johannson’s Nichole and Adam Driver’s Charlie, a wife and husband, describing what they appreciate in the other in what we learn is a divorce mediator’s homework for the irreconcilably differenced couple.

The letters each wrote about the other parallels Agarwal’s and Musk’s mutual masturb … er, appreciation society.

I use Twitter sparingly. I’m not a Musk-o-vite. Regardless, I will note how this pans out.