The Media’s Paywall Obsession Won’t Work for Most:

Many of us will, therefore, only pay a monthly fee towards one or two publications that we find really valuable; and, for most of us, that’s probably a national broadsheet “paper of record” rather than a thin local edition. But the national papers of record can’t realistically cover all local news of relevance across an entire country. Also, I’ve focused on American papers here, but this is a massive problem in Canada as well, and around the world.

(Via Pixel Envy)

I’m no fan of the subscription model but I found the idea that GDPR might drive change interesting:

Perhaps new legislation and the reclamation of our privacy online will spur the creation of small, privacy-focused advertiser networks again, akin to the Deck Network or something like the Outline’s ad strategy. Perhaps we need more networks of bloggers, too, allowing readers to subscribe to several related websites at the same time, without creating barriers to readership with paywalls. Maybe there’s a third and fourth source of money beyond readers and advertisers — I’m not sure. But non-giant entities, whether web-only or in print, need a funding solution for the future that isn’t solely reliant upon massive traffic, Facebook referrals, or subscriptions.

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Meet the journalism student who found out she won a Pulitzer in class

On Monday afternoon, Mariel Padilla, a master’s student at Columbia Journalism School, sat around a table with classmates, listening to Professor Giannina Segnini lead a discussion about email encryption for reporting across borders.A couple floors below, journalism bigwigs and other members of the press crowded into the World Room, an ornate, high-ceilinged chamber reserved for the event, eager to watch Pulitzer Prize Administrator Dana Canedy announce this year’s winners. For Padilla, who moved to New York last year from the small town of Oxford, Ohio, just being in geographic proximity to the announcement was a thrill.

“I knew I was going to be two floors above where it was happening,” she says, reflecting on the moment, “and I remember thinking, Oh, that’s cool, I can tell people that I was in the same building [where] the Pulitzers are being announced!”

Little did she know she was about to become a Pulitzer winner herself.

(Via Columbia Journalism Review)

What a story. 23 years old, only in journalism for about 2 years, and she lands a Pulitzer.

Read the whole story to learn more. I am jealous.

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Note: This is a total knee jerk reaction to the tweets & post from The Verge that Chris Ziegler was simultaneously a new Apple employee and an existing The Verge editor covering Apple.

Working for two employers at once isn’t new. It happens all the time.

But you can’t report about company B for company A while also an employee for company B. It’s Journalism 101, a class I took. I know famous corporate blogs and sites occasionally like to blur journalistic lines. This violation, if true, is clear.

Assuming Tim Cook didn’t appear apropos of nothing on Chris Ziegler’s doorstep the day his dual employment began, and nothing in what I’ve read so far indicates an immaculate hiring, The Verge should at least brand every article Chris wrote for the past 6 months as suspect. His motives aren’t known. We can only speculate when Mr. Ziegler entered into discussion and ultimately received the offer to join Apple.

Apple should dismiss Mr. Ziegler if the accusations are true. If he was duplicitous to The Verge management, co-workers, and readers it stands to reason he will be duplicitous to Apple as well. His ethics, at least, are questionable.

If someone I hired knowingly still worked in such a conflict of interest I would fire them for cause. I’d be curious to learn of environments where such action wouldn’t be the norm.

Again, I don’t know all the details or all the facts. If correct, the course for Apple and The Verge is clear.

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A friend pointed out to me that an article I shared was little but click bait. I admit to only skimming the content before posting. I do that.

Unless a URL I post on social networks refers to prjorgensen.com, pvcsec.com, or one of my other sites directly, I apply cursory or less verification as to the authenticity, veracity, quality, security, or reliability of the data.

The journalist in me WANTS to vet everything I post via all the media. I lack the time.

What do you do? How do you not echo click bait?

Comment here or hashtag #askpvcsec on Twitter.

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