Mozilla Firefox to Enable Hyperlink Ping Tracking By Default by Lawrence Abrams:

Firefox
Mozilla has told BleepingComputer that they will be enabling the tracking feature called hyperlink auditing, or Pings, by default in Firefox. There is no timeline for when this feature will be enabled, but it will be done when their implementation is complete.
For those not familiar with hyperlink auditing, it is a HTML feature that allows web sites to track link clicks by adding the “ping=” attribute to HTML links. When these links are clicked, in addition to navigating to the linked to page, the browser will also connect to the page listed in the ping= attribute, which can then be used to record the click.

When these links are displayed on the page, they will appear as a normal link and if a user clicks on it, there is no indication that a connection is being made to a different page as well.

Mozilla feels it’s a performance improvement

While some users feel this feature is a privacy risk, browsers developers feel that trackers are going to track, so you might as well offer a solution that provides better performance.

When we asked if they felt that users should at least be given the ability to disable the feature if they wish, Mozilla stated that they did not believe it would have any “meaningful improvement” to a user’s privacy.
“We don’t believe that offering an option to disable this feature alone will have any meaningful improvement in the user privacy, since website can (and often already do) detect the various supported mechanisms for hyperlink auditing in each browser and disabling the more user friendly mechanisms [ed: bold mine] will cause them to fall back to the less user friendly ones, without actually disabling the hyperlink auditing functionality itself.”

How is this “user friendly” exactly? Let’s block all of the tracking mechanisms and let people explicitly opt in to share their data … especially considering this method is already being used in DDoS attacks.

Or maybe just be transparent. That the user doesn’t know and can’t know without parsing the HTML themselves that these are there is … problematic at best.

The annual Earth Day Matsuri (Festival) is taking place at Yoyogi Park’s event space this weekend (20-21 April 2018). Every year I think I won’t go, I end up going, and enjoy myself in the process.

Every year when I come back I can’t help but think, “If we all consume less and then, when we consume we’re more thoughtful about it”, wouldn’t that be better for the environment than buying a bunch of organically grown and ethically harvested cotton made into a T-Shirt you don’t need?

Of course, that is a gross over simplification of the complexities. And the reality of existence is that one needs income to live pretty much everywhere on the planet. By not consuming you negatively impact the job of the farmer and picker and weaver and dyer and …

Two Part Job:

 
Part of your job is to do your job.

But the other main part of your job is to help others feel good about you doing that job.

If you can cause others to be glad that you do what you do, they’ll want you to do it again and they’ll tell their friends.

(Via Gabe The Bass Player)

Mistakes, chatter, and showing up:

The more time we spend trying to build new things or get work that matters done, the more mistakes we are inevitable going to make.

I’ve come to realize that the key is to not let the chatter (both external and internal) about the mistakes and the stuff that is broken to get in the way of showing up every day with enthusiasm.

Every day, we get the opportunity to solve puzzles that involve continually prioritizing between fixing what’s broken, plugging short term gaps, and investing in the long term. We get to do this in our products, in our communities, in our families, and within ourselves.

We (and what we build) are always going to be work in progress. Once we accept that, it follows that the best thing we can do is to make the most of that opportunity and continue to earn it every day.

In the long run, it turns out that becoming is far more important than being.

(Via A Learning a Day)

Wow. That’s … not relatable for a lot of people, IT or otherwise.

My takeaways? Show up and learn from mistakes instead of letting them get in your way. If the rest applies, that’s gravy.

Laptop holding techniques in the office — Quartz at Work:

They walk among us in just about every office: People with their laptops open, bound for conference rooms and common areas, many keeping their devices ajar to avoid losing those precious few seconds of computer wake-up time.

While we cloak our phones in shock-proof plastic and their screens with tempered-glass shields, laptops rarely get similar protection. Considering these pieces of hardware are some of the most expensive items we work with, it’s a little shocking to see how cavalier we can be toward our one essential work device.

But since when has safety outweighed looking cool?

Over the past few weeks, we’ve been observing Quartzians in their natural habitat and have tried to make sense of their odd office rituals in porting their laptops from one meeting to the next. Here are some of our findings.

This is some silly fun. I know which one I am (“The Clutch”) and which I’d like to be (“The Vacationer”).

I’m working on improving my health. Lifehacker has what I think might be a useful post:

Where to Start When You Want to Optimize Your Health:

Exercise, any kind

You can run, lift weights, do yoga, take classes—there are tons of options. Any exercise is better than none, and if you’re feeling out of shape, try doing a little more than whatever you’re currently doing.

A healthy week’s worth of exercise should include:

Some cardio
Some strength training

You might be a runner who gets in a few quick strength sessions, or a lifter who hops on the rower for a little cardio once or twice a week. Or maybe you play a sport that gives you a good mix of both in every practice.

If you’re new to everything, explore until you find something you love.

Here’s the problem: there is no form of exercise that I love.

I’m someone who played three sports in high school, played a bunch of intramural at uni, and even played soe semi-organized soccer and hockey (ice and roller blade) as an adult. I like to hike. I like to swim. I like to bike. I will lift weights or use a machine. I will hop on a treadmill.

Love enters into none of my exercise equation. I’ve never experienced any kind of “high” from exercise or sports. I even ran cross country for a hot minute in high school and stopped because it was such a slog and boring.

More sleep and less garbage food & stress – those I get behind whole heartedly.

jwz: Infocom:

Jason Scott just posted all of the Infocom source, which is glorious!

<TELL “The ” D ,GLASS-CASE ” is “> <TELL “open”>) (T <TELL “closed”>)> ) ( >> ) (<VERB? MUNG> )>>

Zarf summarizes:

“This material has been kicking around for a while now. If you search for articles about “the Infocom drive”, you’ll see some discussion from years past. Actually, don’t do that, it’s mostly old arguments that don’t need to be rehashed.

The point is that a great deal of historical information about Infocom has been preserved — but it’s not publicly archived. You can’t go research it anywhere. Nobody admits to having it, because it’s “proprietary IP”, and you’re not supposed to trade in that stuff because companies like Activision make the rules.

So when Jason puts this information online, he’s taking a stance. The stance is: history matters. Copyright is a balance between the rights of the owner to profit and the rights of the public to investigate, discuss, and increase the sphere of culture. Sometimes the balance needs a kick.

Quite possibly all these repositories will be served with takedown requests tomorrow. I’m downloading local copies for myself tonight, just in case.”

If you’re in a mirroring mood:

curl “https://api.github.com/users/historicalsource/repos?page=1&per_page=100″ | grep git_url | cut -d \” -f 4 | xargs -L1 git clone

Read on for a fun fact.

Cognitive load is real | Seth’s Blog:

Here’s my list, in order, of what drives behavior in the modern, privileged world:

  • Fear
  • Cognitive load (and the desire for habit and ease)
  • Greed (fueled by fear)
  • Curiosity
  • Generosity/connection

The five are in an eternal dance, with capitalist agents regularly using behavioral economics to push us to trade one for the other. We’re never satisfied, of course, which is why our culture isn’t stable. We regularly build systems to create habits that lower the cognitive load, but then, curiosity amplified by greed and fear (plus our search for connection and desire to love) kick in and the whole cycle starts again.

I like Seth’s set up for this but not the corporate entity as the example. Here’s a sanitised version:

…without habits, every decision requires attention. And attention is exhausting.

And it’s stressful because the choices made appear to be expensive. There’s a significant opportunity cost to doing this not that. … what are you going to skip? What if it’s not worth the [time or wait]? What are you missing?

It’s all fraught. We feel the failure of a bad choice in advance, long before we discover whether or not it was actually bad.

What consistently good communicators do:

What consistently good communicators do: Prepare thoroughly, show up on time, seek to understand, be thoughtful about their contributions, pay attention to non-verbal cues, and follow up.

When they do all of this, they succeed in reaching the people they’re speaking to in the right context – unerringly.

It turns out that being a consistently good communicator is largely determined by what we do when we’re not trying to communicate.

This post came out a while ago. I was reminded to write about it when I saw the 16 April Daily Stoic entry, OBSERVE CAUSE AND EFFECT:

“Pay close attention in conversation to what is being said, and to what follows from any action. In the action, immediately look for the target, in words, listen closely to what’s being signaled.”
—MARCUS AURELIUS, MEDITATIONS, 7.4

To both quotes, there is an undercurrent of presence, of being in the moment when communicating. Being distracted by a laptop, tablet, or phone takes away from that presence.

The other undercurrent is that communication is, by definition, bidirectional (or full duplex for the networking nerds out there). It’s funny to me how many people forget that.

Git and Plain Text for Writers | Irreal:

Although the article, by Seth Kenlon, is advertised as considering the question “Why (prose) writers should use Git,” I think the more important takeaway is that writers should embrace plain text. Kenlon makes a persuasive case that authors would be better off trashing their word processors and using a combination of a text editor and Markdown.

Kenlon’s text editor of choice is Atom (although he does mention Emacs as an alternative), which is, I think, leaving money on the table. Other than the obvious but subjective judgment that Emacs is a better, more customizable editor, it is virtually universally acknowledged that Magit is the best Git interface—integrated or not—and that Org mode markup is superior to Markdown, especially when its Babel interface is taken into consideration.

Of course, those are the opinions of an Emacs partisan so others may disagree but it’s hard to see how one can argue about Magit or Org mode. In any event, the important point stands: embrace plain text. If you do any writing at all, you should take a look at Kenlon’s article, especially if you’re still using Word or one of its evil offspring.

There’s more here and here.