Screenwriter Shinobu Hashimoto, who worked on iconic Kurosawa films, dies at age 100 | The Japan Times https://www.japantimes.co.jp/culture/2018/07/20/entertainment-news/screenwriter-shinobu-hashimoto-worked-iconic-kurosawa-films-dies-age-100/

Like many Americans, #Kurosawa films were my introduction to Japan. I didn’t know about Hashimoto-sama’s contribution until now.

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The Space Force Should Improve the Cybersecurity of Space Assets:

President Trump offered his support last month for the creation of a Space Force within the U.S. military. In a paper released last week, my Harvard colleague Greg Falco argues that one of the first missions for this new force should be to improve the cybersecurity of space assets. This proposal is worthy of deep consideration as the cybersecurity of space assets remains a top, if underexamined, priority for national security, and the opportunity to shape the roles and missions of a new Space Force will soon pass. 

Falco does not hype the threat, but his assessment of the risks are sobering: The consequences of disrupting or degrading connectivity are striking when one considers how much of U.S. critical infrastructure relies on connectivity in or through space. His recommendations take a similarly balanced approach and offer interested policymakers a few potential steps to get started, such as modifying pertinent sections of the Code of Federal Regulations. 

One area that could benefit from future research is how to deconflict roles and missions between a Space Force (or the military in general), the Department of Homeland Security, NASA and other parts of the federal government. This specific issue is a bit beyond the scope of Falco’s paper, but it reflects a challenge that still seems to bedevil federal cybersecurity policy: Who exactly is in charge of what?  Space assets and affiliated organizations span the military, civilian government and multiple private-sector spheres. Perhaps more than any other sector of the U.S. economy and society, improving the cybersecurity of space assets really will require a whole-of-nation approach. 

(Via Lawfare – Hard National Security Choices)

It’s a stupid name. However, I generally agree that this should be job #1. The risks are simply too great to delay action in understanding, mitigating, and remediating (where possible).

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The Power of iOS Keyboard Shortcuts:

When you work in split view it can be hard to tell which app has the keyboard connected to it, there is no kind of indication outside of a blinking cursor if you are using a text editor that supports that.

One thing I have noticed that helps is if you quickly tap on the app you want to use the keyboard with. This isn’t ideal, but it is the best option I have found that works with iOS 11 as of now (and the iOS 12 beta as well).

(Via Tablet Habit)

When I was two weeks with only the iPad Pro I found this immensely frustrating. The suggested work around here did not work universally, for example with Reeder open on the left and Drafts 5 on the right when I triggered Drafts to receive input I could not switch back to Reeder for keyboard navigation.

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America’s ramen obsession:

The latest video in the New Yorker’s Annals of Obsession tracks the transformation of ramen from a cheapo dorm room food to current culinary obsession showing no signs of abating. I ate the cheap ramen in college, dined at David Chang’s Momofuku Noodle Bar early on, and might pick ramen as my death-bed food,1 so I guess this video was pretty much made for me. Honestly the toughest part about where I live right now is the 2-hour roundtrip drive to eat ramen.

  1. Specifically, I would have a bowl of the shoyu ramen from Ivan.

    Tags: food   ramen   video

(Via kottke.org)

An evergreen topic for me for sure as living in Tokyo means I can swing a dead cat and hit a dozen noodle shops.

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Five ways to make your presentation better:

  1. Make it shorter. No extra points for filling your time.
  2. Be really clear about what it’s for. If the presentation works, what will change? Who will be changed? Will people take a different course of action because of your work? If not, then why do you do a presentation?
  3. Don’t use slides as a teleprompter. If you have details, write them up in a short memo and give it to us after the presentation.
  4. Don’t sing, don’t dance, don’t tell jokes. If those three skills are foreign to you, this is not a good time to try them out.
  5. Be here now. The reason you’re giving a presentation and not sending us a memo is that your personal presence, your energy and your humanity add value. Don’t hide them. Don’t use a prescribed format if that format doesn’t match the best version of you.

And a bonus: the best presentation is one you actually give. Don’t hide. Don’t postpone it. We need to hear from you.

A presentation is expensive. It’s many of us, in real time, in sync, all watching you do your thing. If you’re going to do it live, make it worth it. For us and for you.

(Via Seth’s Blog)

I’m pasting a copy of this in my work notebook. I’m strong at #3 & #5, need some improvement on #1 & #2, and #4 … well, sometimes I struggle with that.

I suggest the following amendment:

6. Avoid jargon, acronyms, and colloquialisms. Unless speaking to a homogenous audience, try not to use too much specialized language which could leave portions of your audience lost.

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